Lists

Ten Questions to Ask When You Feel Stuck

It happens to the best of us. From time to time, we feel stuck and our strength to move forward depends on the level of clarity we have about the causes and potential effects of our current circumstances. That clarity doesn’t always come, and so we aren’t always sure what to do next. Dwelling on potential causes of the setbacks we experience generates regret about our own actions and/or resentment toward others. Letting our imagination get the best of us relative to all the bad things that are going to possibly happen creates worry and fear. And trying to let the past go or trying not to worry, although well-intentioned, do not carry the day unless we find a way to gain clarity and look at our current circumstances through an objective lens.

6 Essential Factors for Improving Organizational Communication

Let’s face it: just about every organization out there is full of opportunities to improve communication. The only real difference between them is that some realize it, and some don’t. For every organization that has acknowledged the issue and is actively working on it, there are many more that either have a case of “deer in the headlights” or are in full-blown denial.

6 Steps to Transformative Visioning for an Extraordinary Year

Whether you are a go-getter, a planner, or a set-it-and-forget-it type of person, I think we can all agree that our chances of living a life of our design are improved when we have a fairly detailed idea of what it is that we want. As Zig Ziglar put it, “If you aim at nothing, you’ll hit it every time!” Unfortunately, too many of us do just that. We don’t establish a clear vision what we want, and yet we expect whatever it is to just fall into our laps, somehow and someday. Well, I have good news and bad news. The bad news is that that isn’t how things work, but the good news is that once I explain how things do work, you can start putting them to work for yourself.

8 Unanswered Questions Hindering Your Organization's Transformation

As explained in one particular interpretation of Open System Theory applied to organizational operation, there are three interrelated processes that are simultaneously running within every organization that directly determine the outcomes that they produce. Firstly, the Production Core Process, which has to do with all the activities that are directly related to producing the results. Secondly, the Individual Core Process, which involves that’s most important to the individuals relative to their own personal and professional objectives. And finally, the Social Core Process that involves the integration of the other two core processes in a way that creates the appropriate synergy as individuals work together to meet their individual and organizational objectives. None of these processes operates in isolation from one another, meaning that a failure in one will necessarily translate eventually to failure in the other two, and vice versa. High performance organizations devote the appropriate amount of time and attention to all three of these processes to ensure they work in concert to create common objectives between individuals, teams and the organization as a whole, while underperforming organizations overemphasize one process to the detriment of the others.