"How Socially Aware Leaders Create High Performance Cultures" - An Interview with Jason Treu | The Transformative Leader Podcast 043

In this episode of The Transformative Leader Podcast, I’m excited to bring you a discussion with high-performance executive coach, best-selling author, and developer of “Cards Against Mundanity,“ Jason Treu. Jason helps companies develop strong internal relationships to establish a culture where people enjoy showing up to work, consequently increasing productivity and driving revenue. In his work, he recognizes the essential role that interpersonal skills and self-awareness play in successfully leading high performance organizations. A leading expert on human behavior, leadership, influence, and networking, Jason understands that the only way to create HPOs is by creating high-performing cultures, and the only way to do that is by helping leaders uncover their blind spots and replace them with extraordinary habits and skill sets that create success and fulfillment for the whole team. This was a really great conversation with a passionate guest, and listeners really can’t afford to miss this episode!

Being Imperfect Doesn't Disqualify You from Being a Leader

Over the weekend, I got an unscheduled call from one of the employees at a company that I’m currently doing some consulting with. There was nothing unusual about that in itself, as I had made it clear that I was available to pretty much anyone within the organization whenever they felt the need to reach out. This particular employee was calling specifically to ask for my help in getting out of “the stands” and getting back “on the court.” He had just found out that he had been turned down for a promotion that he felt he deserved. He had been doing all the right things and he just knew the formal announcement was coming, only to find out that someone else had gotten the position. Needless to say, the news had left him seriously demoralized and disappointed in himself, and he made the wise decision to seek a little outside support.

"The Challenges of Transforming Nonprofit Cultures" - An Interview with Sarah Olivieri | The Transformative Leader Podcast 042

In this episode of The Transformative Leader Podcast, I’m excited to bring you a discussion with nonprofit strategist and leader, Sarah Olivieri. Sarah is a fascinating guest with a wide range of experience in both technical and humanistic domains, speaking on a topic that we don’t cover much on the blog or podcast: nonprofits. That isn’t because I think nonprofits are unimportant, but simply because I have very little experience working directly with them. So I was very interested to learn about the challenges that nonprofits face and how those challenges are being addressed by leaders in the field, such as Sarah and her company PivotGround. I certainly learned a lot in this conversation, and I know my listeners will too. It was an honor to speak to someone doing the truly important work of not just increasing profits for businesses, but helping to make nonprofits better so that they can make the world better for all of us.

Ten Lessons I Learned from Bad Bosses

I have been abundantly blessed with the success I have enjoyed during my 31-year corporate career and now as an independent consultant. Looking back, I can clearly see that much of my personal growth as a leader came about while I grappled with the challenges of the turnaround situations I was deployed to. There were at least 7 of those that I can recall, and they all served a purpose in some form of fashion. Although it was painful at the time, I can’t help but credit the most rapid and powerful growth spurts in my career to behaviors I saw from bad bosses that I was clear I should never emulate.

The Last Thing You Need is More Training

A couple of weeks ago, I attended a conference where a behavioral scientist was making a case for the fact that having information does not necessarily lead to behavior change. As I like to put it: it isn’t knowing what to do, but doing what you know, that makes all the difference. While we all accept that we have to know better before we can do better, many of us confuse the former for the latter, and this is where we end up getting held back.